back to school (reprise)

The return to Bordeaux has been a complete change of pace from the harvest in Alsace. A relaxed schedule has given me time to work on my internship report and presentation, not to mention time to rediscover my old stomping grounds.

Refamiliarizing myself with the territory: fog on the walk to school; the Cité du Vin is a new attraction. Rue Ste Catherine is empty on the holiday - you can actually see the obelisk at Place de la Victoire at the other end! Cleanup in Place de la Bourse and an evening view of the Pont Jacques Chaban Delmas.

Refamiliarizing myself with the territory: fog on the walk to school; the Cité du Vin is a new attraction. Rue Ste Catherine is devoid of shopping hordes on the holiday – you can actually see the obelisk at Place de la Victoire at the other end! Cleanup in Place de la Bourse and an evening view of the Pont Jacques Chaban Delmas.

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when autumn leaves start to fall

Harvesting the Pinot Gris from the steep slopes of Rangen calls for smaller baskets.

Harvesting Pinot Gris from the steep slopes of Rangen calls for smaller baskets.

It’s been six weeks since my last post, as I’ve been preoccupied with the busy harvest days, and the lead-up to the end of my stage (and therefore my return to Bordeaux). The days pass by in a blur. There’s a rhythm to this faster pace particularly around the end of September, although it is punctuated by slow days when we’re not harvesting due to unreadiness of certain grapes and parcels.

In broad, broad terms, the harvest begins with the grapes in the Pinot family: Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Auxerrois, and even Pinot Noir, the only red grape we have. This is followed by the Muscat, Chardonnay and Riesling, and Gewurztraminer tends to be the last to be ready. I emphasize broad terms because many factors can impact the decision to harvest each varietal: the geography – the plains tend to be harvested before the slopes (the generic wines before the Grand Cru wines), and the soil – the granite tends to ripen earlier, and the volcanic rock later. Additionally, the type of wine desired also impacts the timing decision: grapes for drier wines will come in before grapes for sweeter wines, like the Late Harvest planned for some of our Pinot Gris. Read More

the fruit of our labour

The harvest is finally here! After tasting and analysing the grapes from various parcels for a few weeks, the domaine has decided that our grapes are ready to be harvested. Some of them, anyway. With so many different grape varieties and types of terroir, let alone parcels with different elevation and sun exposure, we will have roughly 20 days of harvesting ahead of us, which could be consecutive, or spread out over six weeks. The appellation needs to declare the official start to the harvest, based on input from various analyses throughout the region, but domaines can apply for an earlier date if their parcels indicate a higher level of maturity. This year the Crémant harvest is declared on September 12, and the still wine harvest, a week later on September 19. Sparkling wines are typically harvested earlier because the balance needed for the final wine is slightly higher acidity and lower sugar levels than for still, dry wines.

Other wineries start harvesting the crémant while we are still gathering our prélèvements, or samples for analysis.

Other wineries start harvesting the crémant while we are still touring the vineyards, gathering our prélèvements, or samples for analysis.

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(ve)raison d’être

The yellow star is where I live and (mostly) work. This domaine has vineyard parcels as far north as Hunawihr and as far south as Thann, all in the Haut-Rhin.

I started sending postcards to my wee nephew the summer I walked the camino, ostensibly in an effort to augment his 5 year old view on culture and geography, but in reality because I was going to miss our bi-weekly skype sessions, and was terrified he would forget who I was. The postcards have now expanded to include my nearly-4-year-old niece, while I wrack my brain to write a) neatly and b) topically, or at least simply enough that they have an idea of what’s going on, on this side of the ocean. I am under strict instructions to send postcards with maps, by all parties involved, as it seems to be a fun pastime to try and identify where-in-the-world-is-Aunt Cat. With that in mind, I’m going to do the same thing for you, as I haven’t really written about the region of Alsace since the introduction to my stage search, and my February visit.

Frankly, it’s a little intimidating to write about this wine region as there are so many different terroirs (13, officially), a big range of grape varietals (6 white grapes and 1 red are considered Grand Cru worthy, although other white grapes are permitted), 51 Grand Crus (!), and many lieux-dit (‘named’ places that are recognized but not considered as high quality as Grand Cru).

I’m currently located in the Haut-Rhin, the high-Rhine, or the south of Alsace. The higher slopes of the Vosges confer better sun exposure and water drainage for the grapes, thus the best wines tend to come from the Haut-Rhin rather than the Bas-Rhin, or northern Rhine. The domaine where I work has vineyard parcels in 5 of the Grand Crus, and 6 of the 7 ‘official’ Alsace grape varieties; in white: Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and Muscat (no Sylvaner), and in red: Pinot Noir, in very small quantities. Read More

ain’t no mountain dry enough

wpid-house-its-not-lupus-its-never-lupus

It’s NEVER Lupus!

The bites and scrapes are starting to add up. Skin is so exposed with the heat, and mine is extra sensitive, as I’ve discovered it responds poorly to copper sulfate spray, so each new lump and bump comes with a whole host of paranoic wonderment: is it a mosquito bite? Is it an allergic reaction? ….. Is it lyme disease? …………….SKIN CANCER?? (In a dark corner of my room, I KNOW there’s a spider rubbing at least three of his legs together, saying: the Precious tastesss ssssso much better with a dash of fear.) Just kidding… said spider has been satisfyingly vanquished. It made the mistake of hiding behind the bathroom door in plain sight at a time when my roommate and I had enough liquid courage to construct a strategy and take it out. Even though we could see hairs on its legs. (That’s Madame Dragonslayer to you!) Read More